I know, but I Would Rather Be Beautiful

The Impact of Self-Esteem, Narcissism, and Knowledge on Addictive Tanning Behavior in Millennials

By AMY WATSON, GAIL ZANK, AND ANNA M. TURRI
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This research examines consumers’ current level of sun protection knowledge and prevention, tanning motivation, and behavior. This baseline information provides a clearer understanding of actual consumer behavior and can be used to determine what knowledge deficit sexist so that future research, educational materials, and communication efforts can be tailored to address those more directly. Additionally, the relationships between knowledge, self-esteem, and narcissism are explored. Results show that knowledge has no impact on addictive tanning behavior, self-esteem is negatively correlated, and narcissism is fully mediated by appearance motivation. Implications, potential regulatory, and communication efforts are discussed.

Dr. Gail Zank, Dr. Anna Turri, and their coauthor find that: individuals with lower self-esteem and higher narcissism exhibit greater levels of addictive tanning behavior; and increased knowledge of skin cancer risk leads to lower levels of addictive tanning.

See what they are saying about the study in the popular press:
https://nypost.com/2018/04/30/not-even-cancer-risk-stops-millennials-from-outdoor-tanning/

https://www.webmd.com/mental-health/news/20180502/what-drives-millennials-to-tan-knowing-the-risks#1

https://wgntv.com/2018/04/25/millennials-are-not-using-sunscreen-due-to-narcissism-low-self-esteem-osu-study-says/

https://www.upi.com/Millennials-young-people-tan-despite-cancer-risk-Study/4441525277793/